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 Program Outline :: Detailed Program

UPDATE: 11.10.21: Program/Abstractbook updated: minor corrections & updates.

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Program Outline

 

Calendar Week 38

Mon. 20.9.

Opening Ceremony - live on YouTube
Bestowal of “Life Science Awards Austria ‘21”, awardee lectures

Tues. 21.9.

#1: Chromatin and gene regulation
KEYNOTE: Bas van Steensel, NL Cancer Inst. - live on YouTube

 

#2: Cell Biology and Biochemistry of Lipids

Wed. 22.9.

#3: RNA Biology

 

#4: Biophysical and Structural Aspects of Signaling Proteins

Thur. 23.9.

#5: Proteostasis and membrane trafficking

 

#6: Immunology

 

 

Calendar Week 39

Tues. 28.09.

#7: Cell proliferation and Cell division

 

#8: Toxicology

Wed. 29.09.

#9: Single-cell multiomics

 

#10: Metabolic Signaling
KEYNOTE: Lisa Henske, Harvard Medical School - live on YouTube

Thurs. 30.09.

#11: Biotech

 

 

Calendar Week 41

Tues. 12.10.

#12: Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

Wed. 13.10.

#13: Stem Cells

 

#14: Host-Pathogen Interactions

Thurs. 14.10.

#15: Translational Oncology
KEYNOTE: Douglas Hanahan, EPFL
Closing & Awards Ceremony - live on YouTube

 

Detailed Program

Please click on the respective session title to view detailed information. You can view speakers/chairs biosketch by clicking on their portrait.

Sessions are planned to take place in the afternoons from 13:15-18:15. Please check the Abstarctbook PDF for the latest updates to the program schedules of each session.

Mon 20.09: Opening & Life Science Austria Award Ceremony - live on YouTube

Chairs

Lukas A. Huber

Lukas A. Huber
ÖGMBT President, Institute of Cell Biology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Hesso Farhan

Hesso Farhan
Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Fleischhacker Wolfgang

W. Wolfgang Fleischhacker, MD
President of the Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 

Tue 21.09: #1: Chromatin and gene regulation - sponsored by LabBuddy Logo

Session Description

Gene regulation is orchestrated by a fascinating ensemble of factors, ranging from transcription factor proteins to RNA and to chromatin, requiring intricate cooperation between the different players. Chromatin- and RNA-mediated mechanisms are at the heart of gene regulatory strategies, and the KEYNOTE given by Bas van Steensel as well as the two talks given by plenary speakers Andreas Ladurner and Mathias Munschauer, will provide insight into these topics. Further aspects will be covered by short talks selected from submitted abstracts.

This session is sponsored by LabBuddy Logo

Chairs

Alexandra Lusser

Alexandra Lusser
Institute of Molecular Biology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Matthias Erlacher

Matthias Erlacher
Division of Genomics & RNomics, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Sebastian Herzog
Institute for Developmental Immunology, Medical Univ. of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

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Andreas Ladurner
Department of Physiological Chemistry, Biomedical Center LMU München/DE

Structural basis for NAD-metabolite-regulated activation of nucleosome remodeling by the oncogene ALC1

Mathias Munschauer

Mathias Munschauer
HIRI Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research, Würzburg/DE

The SARS-CoV-2 RNA-protein interactome identifies novel antiviral host factors

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KEYNOTE: Bas van Steensel - live on YouTube
Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam/NL

Regulatory principles of lamina- and nucleolus- associated domains

 

Tue 21.09: #2: Cell Biology and Biochemistry of Lipids

Session Description

This session will focus on all aspects of lipids ranging from emerging functions of lipid species, state-of-the-art lipid analytics, nutritional aspects of lipids to lipid metabolism in health and disease. We want to gather scientists covering fields from basic research to physicians that are united by their common interest in lipids and will discuss in this interdisciplinary session.

Chairs

Kathrin Watschinger

Katrin Watschinger
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Markus Keller
Institute of Human Genetics, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speaker

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Ruth Birner-Grünberger
Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology/AT

Lipid hydrolysis in cancer

Claypool Steven

Steven Claypool
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore/US

Mitochondrial membrane musings

 

Wed 22.09: #3: RNA Biology

Session Description

RNA is a versatile molecule that is not only able to store the genetic information but also performs regulatory functions as well as catalytic activities. The variability of the biological role of RNA, its chemical composition and processing, as well as its potential as catalytic tool are highlighted in the two main talks given by Stepanka Vanacova and Claudia Höbartner. Additional topics covering RNA biology will be presented in selected short talks and science flashes.

Chairs

Matthias Erlacher

Matthias Erlacher
Division of Genomics & RNomics, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Sebastian Herzog
Institute for Developmental Immunology, Medical Univ. of Innsbruck/AT

Alexandra Lusser

Alexandra Lusser
Institute of Molecular Biology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Claudia Höbartner

Claudia Höbartner
Institute of Organic Chemistry, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg/DE

Ribozymes meet RNA modifications

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Stepanka Vanacova
CEITEC - Central European Institute of Technology, Prague/CZ

The spatial interactome of the m6A and m6Am enzymes

 

Wed 22.09: #4: Biophysical and Structural Aspects of Signaling Proteins

Session Description

Proteins are key drivers of crucial cellular processes including signaling, immune defense, and generation of membrane potential. Characterizing structural properties of proteins and their variability in detail opens the gates for development of therapeutical strategies. Specific aspects of protein-modifying enzymes will be highlighted by our invited speakers. Thomas Leonard will focus on key regulatory principles of signal transduction, and Patrick Eyers will discuss how to identify new drugs that interfere with pseudokinase-based signaling mechanisms. Short Talks and Science Flashes will cover computational and experimental approaches as well as method developments.

Chairs

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Theresia Dunzendorfer-Matt
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Martin Tollinger

Martin Tollinger
Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speaker

Thomas Leonard

Thomas Leonard
Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna/AT

Size matters – mechanistic insights into growth factor signaling

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Patrick Eyers
Institute of Systems, Molecular and Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool/UK

Shedding light on the dark kinome: kinases and pseudokinases

 

Thu 23.09: #5: Proteostasis and membrane trafficking

Session Description

In this session we will focus on proteostasis within the secretory pathway and its role in diseases. We invite submissions from all scientists working on molecular, cellular and organismic aspects of proteostasis. The topics include but are not limited to quality control and trafficking in the ER, Golgi, mitochondria and endolysosomal system. Furthermore, we welcome submissions from scientists in the field of autophagy, membrane trafficking and organelle homeostasis. We aim to bring together both basic and translational researchers and engage them in an interdisciplinary discussion.

Chair

Hesso Farhan

Hesso Farhan
Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

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Eric Chevet
Oncogenesis, Stress & Signaling Laboratory, Université Rennes 1/FR

Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum proteostasis in cancer

Elif Karagöz

Elif Karagöz
Max Perutz Labs (MFPL), University of Vienna/AT

Phase separation initiates clustering of the ER stress-sensor IRE1

 

Thu 23.09: #6: Immunology

Session Description

We are looking forward to submissions covering immune cell development, activation, and effector functions with a particular focus on mechanisms causing human diseases.

Chairs

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Verena Labi
Institute for Developmental Immunology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Natascha Kleiter
Department for Pharmacology and Genetics, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Matteo Iannacone

Matteo Iannacone
Dynamics of Immune Responses Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan/IT

Functional biology of hepatic CD8+ T cells

Susana Minguet García

Susana Minguet García
Institut für Biologie III, University of Freiburg/DE

Rational design of innovative T cell-based immunotherapies against cancer

 

Tue 28.09: #7: Cell proliferation and Cell division

Session Description

This session will cover topics related to cell division, ranging from mechanical aspects of spindle formation, requirements for entry into and progression through mitosis and meiosis as well as centrosome signaling in proliferation control. Thus, this session will be interesting to many working in such diverse fields as cancer, developmental biology, biophysics and others.

Chair

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Stephan Geley
Division of Molecular Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Marin Barisic
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen/DK

 
Plenary Speakers

Helder Maiato

Helder Maiato
Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Porto/PT

Mechanism of kinetochore fiber maturation in mammals

Sabine Elowe

Sabine Elowe
Department of Pediatrics, Laval University, Quebec City/CA

Regulation of mitotic phosphatase activity by the pseudokinase BUBR1

Iva Tolic

Iva Tolic
Division of Molecular Biology, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Zagreb/HR

Mechanobiology of the mitotic spindle

 

Company/Special Presentations

Company Workshop by zeiss logo rgb

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Christine Strasser
Carl Zeiss, Feldbach/CH

ZEISS Lattice Lightsheet 7 - Discover the subcellular dynamics of life

 

Tue 28.09: #8: Toxicology

Session Description

This session will focus on all aspects of toxicology, including multidisiplinary approaches and analytical methods to assess exposure and to investigate mechanisms of toxicity associated with chemicals related to human, animal and environmental health.

Chairs

Johanna Gostner

Johanna Gostner
Institute of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Herbert Oberacher

Herbert Oberacher
Institute of Legal Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Saskia Trump

Saskia Trump
Berlin Institute of Health, Charité, Berlin/DE

Single-cell transcriptomics as a tool for therapeutic target identification in COVID-19

Herbert Oberacher

Herbert Oberacher
Institute of Legal Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Possibilities and limitations of non-target LC/MS in toxicology

Simone Moser

Simone Moser
Department of Pharmacy - Center for Drug Research, University of Munich/DE

Phyllobilins – ubiquitous natural products with pharmacologically relevant activities

Johannes Kirchmair

Johannes Kirchmair
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Vienna/AT

Computational prediction of the metabolic fate of small molecules

 

Wed 29.09: #9: Single-cell multiomics

Session Description

This year we invite submissions regarding the generation, analysis, integration, and interpretation of multiomic data generated from single cells, with a special focus on innovative technologies and computational tools.

Chairs

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Francesca Finotello
Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Innsbruck/AT

Andreas Pircher

Andreas Pircher
University Hospital for Internal Medicine V, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

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Christoph Bock
CeMM & Medical University of Vienna, Vienna/AT

Looking into the past and future of cells: Single-cell analysis of epigenetic cell states in immunology and cancer

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Diether Lambrechts
Department of Human Genetics, KU Leuven/BE

Single-cell multi-omics profiling of tumors treated with checkpoint immunotherapy

 

Company/Special Presentation

Company Workshop by 10x320

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Hannes Arnold
10x Genomics/DE

10x Genomics Chromium Solutions for Multimodal Analysis of Single Cells

 

Wed 29.09: #10: Metabolic Signaling

Session Description

This session will focus on mechanisms of nutrient sensing and signal transduction that control metabolic homeostasis during health and disease. We aim to bring together physician-scientists and basic researchers to promote interdisciplinary discussion.

Chairs

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Kathrin Thedieck
Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck/AT

Katrin Watschinger

Katrin Watschinger
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Ulrike Rehbein
Institute of Biochemistry, University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Marit Westerterp

Marit Westerterp
Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center Groningen/NL

Role of T-cell cholesterol efflux pathways in aging and atherosclerosis

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Christiane Opitz
German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg/DE

Metabolic signalling through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in cancer

KEYNOTE: Lisa Henske

KEYNOTE: Lisa Henske - live on YouTube
Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge/US

The Pathogenesis and Therapy of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: New Insights  

 

Thu 30.09: #11: Biotech

Session Description

The Biotech session will focus on the translation of bioscience research to biotechnological products. We would like to highlight the steps and processes between scientific results and applications.

Chairs

Christoph Griesbeck

Christoph Griesbeck
MCI – The Entrepreneurial School, Department of Biotechnology & Food Engineering, Innsbruck/AT

Casari Georg

Georg Casari
Haplogen GmbH, on behalf of Biotech Austria/AT

 
Plenary Speaker

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Josef Penninger
Life Sciences Institute, University of British Columbia/CA

ACE2 – from discovery to the heart of a pandemic

 

Tue 12.10: #12: Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration

Session Description

In this session we will focus on molecular, biochemical and cellular mechanisms of Neurodegeneration. We invite submission from scientists working on Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, ALS, Frontotemporal Dementia or a rare neurodegenerative disorder. We aim to bring together scientists working on fundamental as ell as translational aspects of neurodegeneration.

Chair

Hesso Farhan

Hesso Farhan
Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Schweigreiter

Rüdiger Schweigreiter
Institute of Neurobiochemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

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Tiago Outeiro
Experimental Neurodegeneration, University Medical Center Göttingen/DE

Glycation: a molecular connection between diabetes and Parkinson's disease

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Per Nilsson
Division of Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm/SE

The role of autophagy in Alzheimer's neurodegeneration

 

Wed 13.10: #13: Stem Cells

Session Description

Stem cells emerge as an attractive model system to study the pathogenesis of complex diseases as well as therapeutic interventions. Our session will shed light on the potential of stem cells to explore the underlying mechanisms of human diseases, ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders such as Autism or Parkinson’s Disease.

Chairs

Frank Edenhofer

Frank Edenhofer
Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Innsbruck/AT

Ortner Nadine

Nadine Ortner
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

Dimitri Krainc

Dimitri Krainc
Northwestern Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago/US

The Interplay of Mitochondrial and Lysosomal Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

Novarino Gaia

Gaia Novarino
Institute for Science and Technology, Klosterneuburg/AT

Stem cell models to study autism spectrum disorders

 

Wed 13.10: #14: Host-Pathogen Interactions

Session Description

The goal of this session is to bring together scientists working on all aspects related to the crosstalk between infectious pathogens and their host cells or organisms. This includes the mechanisms how fungi, bacteria and viruses enter and thrive in their cells, how they evade the host’s defence mechanisms and how they resist treatment.

Chair

Hesso Farhan

Hesso Farhan
Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

 Bernd T. Schmeck

Bernd T. Schmeck
Institute for Lung Research, University of Marburg/DE

Diffusible Signals and RNA-Networks in host-pathogen interaction.

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Tim Skern
Center of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Vienna/AT

Viral proteins - small but effective multi-taskers

 

Company/Special Presentations

Company Workshop 1 by Takara 440x252

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Tarik Hadi
Takara Bio Europe/FR

Takara Bio advances in CRISPR screens and NGS technologies to capture host/pathogens interaction

 

Thu 14.10: #15: Translational Oncology

Session Description

This session will focus on bridging the gap between basic research and potential clinical application in the field of cancer research. Many cancer-related aspects will be covered, such as the use of liquid biopsies as valuable tools for diagnosis, prognosis and prediction, as well as novel therapeutic strategies. In addition, we will cover the cellular and molecular aspects of tumor progression such as invasion, migration, the crosstalk of cancer cells with their microenvironment, as well as mechanisms of adaptive resistance to therapies and novel therapeutic concepts in cancer treatment. We invite both basic and translational researchers to submit applications for short talks or science flashes.

Chair

Heidelinde Fiegl

Heidelinde Fiegl
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

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Heinz Zoller
Hepatologic Lab, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 
Plenary Speakers

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Jorge Barbazan
Cell migration and invasion, Institut Curie, Paris/FR

Feeling tight: Understanding how stromal compression regulates tumor mechanotransduction  

Catherine Alix-Panabiere

Catherine Alix-Panabières
Laboratory of Rare Circulating Human Cells, University Medical Center of Montpellier/FR

Liquid biopsy: from discovery to clinical application

KEYNOTE: Douglas Hannahan

KEYNOTE: Douglas Hanahan
Laboratory of Translational Oncology/EPFL, Lausanne/CH

Hallmarks of Cancer 21 years on – reflections

 

Company/Special Presentations

Company Workshop 1 by licor logo

Christiane Kerscher

Christiane Kerscher
Scientific Support, LI-COR Biosciences GmbH, Bad Homburg/DE

The importance of reproducible data in health sciences

Company Workshop 2 by NA BMGRP Logo QF

JeanBaptiste Penigault

Jean-Baptiste Penigault
nanoString, Seattle/FR

Resolving Spatial Heterogeneity Using NanoString’s GeoMx® Digital Spatial Profiler

 

Thu 14.10: Closing & Best Short Talk/Science Flash awards - live on YouTube

Chairs

Lukas A. Huber

Lukas A. Huber
ÖGMBT President, Institute of Cell Biology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

Hesso Farhan

Hesso Farhan
Institute of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Innsbruck/AT

 

 

Catherine Alix-Panabières, University Medical Center of Montpellier, FR

Catherine Alix-Panabières

Dr Catherine Alix-Panabières received her PhD degree in 1998 at the Institute of Virology, University Louis Pasteur, in Strasbourg in France. In 1999, she moved to Montpellier where she did a postdoctoral research at the University Medical Centre. During this last decade, Dr Alix-Panabières has focused on optimizing new techniques of enrichment, detection and characterization of viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients with solid tumors. She is the expert for the EPISPOT technology that is used to detect viable CTCs in patients with breast, prostate, colon, head & neck cancer and melanoma. This technology has been recently improved to detect functional CTCs at the single cell level (EPIDROP). Dr Catherine Alix-Panabières & Prof Pantel coined for the first time the term ‘Liquid Biopsy’in 2010 (Trends Mol Med).

In 2010, she achieved getting a permanent position at the Hospital and at the Faculty of Medicine of Montpellier (MCU-PH). As an associate professor, she became the new director of the Laboratory of Rare Human Circulating Cells (LCCRH).

In this unique platform LCCRH, they isolate, detect and characterize CTCs using combinations many technologies. She has authored or co-authored >110 scientific publications in this field during the last years and 12 book chapters, she is the inventor of three patents in the liquid biopsy field and she is part of French national projects: for ex, PANTHER (FUI project), STIC-METABREAST, TACTIK (PHRC) as well as of big European projects: CTC-SCAN (Transcan project), CANCER-ID (IMI project), PROLIPSY (Transcan project) and European Liquid Biopsy Academy (ELBA, Marie-Curie project).

It was a great honor for her to receive the Gallet et Breton Cancer Prize, the highest honor conferred by the French Academy of Medicine in November 2012 and, more recently, the 2017 AACR Awardfor the most cited scientific article in 2015 (Cayrefourcq et al. Cancer Res).

Hannes Arnold, 10x Genomics, DE

Hannes Arnold

Hannes (Hans Peter) Arnold is Senior Science & Technical Advisor for Germany South and Austria with 10x Genomics. He studied Biology, Chemistry, and Practical and Theoretical Education at the LMU in Munich (Germany). He received his PhD on Molecular Biology at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried (Germany). He continued to work in several positions in industry at the interface between sales and science. He has been working for more than 15 years as Sales Specialist and Business Development Manager with different companies in the field of Next Generation Sequencing, genetic and biomarker analysis. He joined 10x Genomics in December 2017.

He loves life and science and life science. 

Barbara Bachmann, Ludwig Boltzmann Research Group Senescence and Healing of Wounds, AT

Barbara Bachmann

Dr. Bachmann holds engineering degrees in Medical Biotechnology from the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences and in Technical Chemistry from the Vienna University of Technology (TUW). She conducted her master's work in part at the Vienna Veterinary School by implementing a cartilage-on-a-chip system for osteoarthritis disease modeling before subsequently switching her biological focus to vascularization-on-chip models for her doctorate. During her doctoral studies at TUW, she gained valuable expertise in microfabrication, prototyping, vascular tissue engineering, vascularization-on-chip, and mechanobiology-on-chip under the supervision of Univ. Profs. Dr. Heinz Redl and Peter Ertl. During her doctorate, Dr. Bachman contributed to 12 peer-reviewed publications, including 5 first-author publications in internationally recognized journals (e.g., Bioeng. Biotech, Nat Sci Rep; Frontiers in Physiology, Mat. Today Bio, Biomicrofluidics).

Jorge Barbazan, Institut Curie, FR

Jorge Barbazan

I am a cancer cell biologist interested in cancer cell migration and metastasis from a biophysics perspective. I did my PhD characterizing the molecular profiles of circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer, and studying how adhesion molecules in CTCs regulate extravasation in hepatic capillaires. More recently, I moved to the tumor microenvironment field, trying to understand how cancer associated fibroblasts exert compressive forces on tumor cells during tumor progression. I use state of the art imaging techniques to visualize how migration/invasion patterns determine tumor metastasis. 

Ruth Birner-Gruenberger, TU Wien, AT

Ruth Birner-Gruenberger

Ruth studied Technical Chemistry in Graz (1991-1998). For her Master thesis, she went to the RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute on Technology) in Australia to work on bacterial membrane lipids and proteins (1996-1997). She then returned to TU Graz for her PhD (supervised by Günter Daum), focusing on yeast mitochondrial lipids (1998-2002). Afterwards, she stayed at TU Graz as a Postdoc in the group of Albin Hermetter in a large consortium project called GOLD (genomics of lipid-associated disorders) led by Rudolf Zechner (2002-2007). It was during that time that Ruth obtained her first own grants and developed activity-based proteomics of lipases.

After her habilitation in biochemistry in 2007, she started her own group at the Medical University of Graz, where she set up and led a core facility for proteomics. In 2011, she was appointed Associate Professor at the Institute of Pathology at Medical University of Graz. Since 2013, she has headed the Omics Center Graz.

Ruth has been a guest professor at institutions around the globe, namely ETH Zurich (2016), UC-Berkeley (2017) and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg (2018). She further has had many functions in different research societies: as vice/president of the Austrian Proteomics and Metabolomics Association (APMA), as member of the General Council of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) and as a board member of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Fettwissenschaft (dgfett.de).

In July 2019, Ruth was appointed Full Professor at the Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics of TU Wien.

Christoph Bock, CeMM & Medical University of Vienna, AT

Christoph Bock

Christoph Bock is a Principal Investigator at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and Professor of [Bio]Medical Informatics at the Medical University of Vienna. His research combines experimental biology (high-throughput sequencing, epigenetics, CRISPR screening, synthetic biology) with computational methods (bioinformatics, machine learning, artificial intelligence) – for cancer, immunology, and precision medicine. Before coming to Vienna, he was a postdoc at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard (2008-2011) and a PhD student at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics (2004-2008). Christoph Bock is also scientific coordinator of the Biomedical Sequencing Facility of CeMM and MedUni Vienna, informatics group leader at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases (LBI-RUD), coordinator of an EU Horizon 2020 project that contributes single-cell sequencing of human organoids to the Human Cell Atlas, fellow of the European Lab for Learning and Intelligent Systems (ELLIS), and elected member of the Young Academy of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He has received important research awards, including the Otto Hahn Medal of the Max Planck Society (2009), an ERC Starting Grant (2016-2021), an ERC Consolidator Grant (2021-2026), and the Overton Prize of the International Society for Computational Biology (2017). He was included in the global list of “Highly Cited Researchers” by Clarivate Analytics (ISI Web of Science) for 2019 and 2020. He co-founded Aelian Biotechnology, a Vienna-based startup company that develops and applies single-cell methods for high-throughput biology and drug discovery.

Eric Chevet, INSERM, FR

Eric Chevet

Eric Chevet is Research Director at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm). After a Ph.D. in Molecular Cell Biology from the University of Paris XI in 1996 and a post-doctoral fellowship at McGill University (Canada), he established his own laboratory at McGill University in 2001 before going back to France in 2006. For the past 20 years he has been investigating the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling and proteostasis control in cancer development. Early 2015, he moved to Rennes in the West part of France to head a Cancer Research Laboratory within the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Eugène Marquis (INSERM U1242). The main objective of this research centre will be to characterize select stress signaling pathways (including ER stress, death receptors, DNA damage) in various cancers and develop novel relevant therapeutics to impede cancer development. Eric Chevet has authored more than 180 publications and few patents, his Hirsh-index is of 60 (Google Scholar). He is an editor of FEBS Journal and took recently a co-editor in chief position at Traffic.

Steven Claypool, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, US

Steven Claypool

Steven Claypool is a product of California’s public education system having received both his BA and MA from the UCSB. Steven’s PhD thesis focused on the trafficking of the neonatal Fc Receptor in polarized epithelial cells, work that was performed under the tutelage of Dr. Richard S. Blumberg at Harvard Medical School. For his post-doctoral studies, Steven switched gears and joined the laboratory of Dr. Carla Koehler at UCLA. There, he began his investigation of mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism, work that is the foundation for the numerous studies ongoing in the CLAYPOOL lab at Hopkins. He is currently a Professor of Physiology and Genetic Medicine, and the Director of the Cellular and Molecular Physiology Graduate Program and the Mitochondrial Phospholipid Research Center.

Sabine Elowe, Centre de Recherche du CHUQ, CA

Sabine Elowe

Sabine Elowe completed her studies in Canada; She received her bachelor studies in Biochemistry at McMaster University where she experienced research for the first time during her co-op placements in both industry and academia.  In 1999, she moved to the University of Toronto where she did her PhD in receptor tyrosine kinase signalling under Dr. Tony Pawson. After receiving her PhD, she moved to Munich in Germany to join the lab of Prof. Erich Nigg at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry where she studied the function and regulation of mitotic kinases. In 2010, she moved back to Canada to establish her own lab where she continues to study kinase structure and function with a particular interest in mitotic kinases using multidisciplinary approaches including high resolution microscopy, mass spectrometry, biochemistry and bioinformatics, often in collaboration with her local and international collaborators.  Shev is delighted to be speaking at the ÖGMBT annual meeting this year.

Patrick A Eyers, University of LIverpool, GB

Patrick A Eyers

Pat is Professor of Cell Signalling and Head of the Department of Biochemistry and Systems Biology, Institute of Systems, Molecular and Integrative Biology, where he runs a multidisciplinary research lab. His interests include all aspects of protein phosphorylation and sulfation, analysis of protein kinase and sulfotransferase regulation, pseudokinases and pseudoenzymes and kinome-wide mechanisms of acquired drug resistance in cells. 

W. Wolfgang Fleischhacker, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

W. Wolfgang FleischhackerNo Biosketch submitted.

Tarik Hadi, Takara Bio Europe, FR

Tarik Hadi

Dr Tarik Hadi has recently joined Takara Bio Europe as a Market Strategy Manager focused on vaccine development and manages Takara’s cloning and protein expression product range including our exclusive In-Fusion® and Capturem® products.Prior to joining Takara, Dr Hadi worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the INSERM unit 866 at the University of Burgundy, identifying new vectorization strategy of immuno-therapeutic drugs for colorectal cancer treatment. He then moved to the New York University Langone Medical Center, where he uncovered crosstalks between immune and vascular cells during the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms.Dr Hadi obtained his PhD in Molecular Biology at the University of Burgundy, France in 2013; During his thesis, he contributed to identify regulatory mechanisms of inflammation leading to the onset of preterm labor.  

Douglas Hanahan, EPFL, CH

Douglas Hanahan

Douglas Hanahan, born in Seattle, Washington, USA, received a bachelor’s degree in Physics from MIT (1976), and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard (1983). He worked at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York (1978-88) initially as a graduate student and then as a group leader. From 1988-2010 he was on the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UCSF in San Francisco. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (2007), the Institute of Medicine (USA) (2008), the US National Academy of Science (2009), and EMBO (2010). In 2011, Hanahan received an honorary degree from the University of Dundee (UK).
His areas of expertise include the following: Cancer; Translational oncology; Genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer; Tumor microenvironment; Angiogenesis; Invasion; Metastasis; Pre-clinical trials;

Elizabeth Henske, Brigham & Women`s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, US

Elizabeth Henske

Elizabeth (Lisa) Petri Henske is the Director of the Center for LAM Research and Clinical Care at Brigham and Women's Hospital.  She is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and a practicing medical oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  Dr. Henske’s laboratory discovered that lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is caused by mutations in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) genes.  She also was the first to discover that the TSC1 and TSC2 proteins physically interact.  Her research laboratory is focused on the cellular, metabolic, and immunologic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of angiomyolipomas and LAM.  Her current interests include the role of the tumor immune microenvironment in the pathogenesis and therapy of TSC and the role of the TFEB/TFE3 transcription factors in TSC tumorigenesis.  She is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, and serves on the Board of Directors of The LAM Foundation and the Professional Advisory Board of the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance.  Dr. Henske has received awards for her research from the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance, The LAM Foundation, the American Thoracic Society, and the Society for Women's Health Research (the Medtronic Prize).  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Claudia Höbartner, University of Würzburg, DE

Claudia Höbartner

Professor of Organic Chemistry, University of Würzburg, Research focus: Nucleic acid chemistry, synthesis of modified RNA, in vitro selection of ribozymes and DNAzymes, structural biology and mechanistic analysis of functional nucleic acids (deoxyribozymes and aptamers)

Matteo Iannacone, San Raffaele Scientific Institute & University, IT

Matteo Iannacone

Matteo Iannacone obtained a M.D. degree from the University of Milan, Italy, followed by a residency in Internal Medicine and a Ph.D. in Immunology from Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Milan, Italy. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA and at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Since 2010, he directs the Dynamics of Immune Responses Laboratory at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy. By combining cutting-edge in vivo imaging techniques and advanced animal models, Matteo has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the immune response and viral-induced immunopathology. His work has been published in the most important scientific journals (including Nature, Cell, Science, Immunity, Nature Medicine, Nature Immunology) and he holds 14 international patents. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the Armenise-Harvard Foundation Career Development Award, an ERC Starting Grant, the Young Investigator Award from the European Association for the Study of the Liver, the EMBO Young Investigator Award, an ERC Consolidator Grant, the Chiara D’Onofrio Award, an ERC Proof of Concept Grant. He is an elected member of the Henry Kunkel Society and of EMBO. As of July 2021, his work has received more than 6900 citations with an H-index of 39.

Domen Kampjut, IST Austria, AT

Domen Kampjut

Domen Kampjut is a structural biologist with an interest in membrane protein complexes, metabolism and signalling. He completed his PhD at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria in 2020, where he focued on structural and mechanistic characterisation of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes. He is currently an EMBO postdoctoral fellow at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology where he studies AMPA receptor complexes and a Junior Research Fellow at Christ's College, Cambridge.

Elif Karagöz, Max Perutz Laboratories, AT

Elif Karagöz

Elif Karagoz is a group leader at Max Pertuz Laboratories in Vienna. She got her Master’s degree in Molecular Biology at the Max Planck Research School in Göttingen. After completing her PhD at Utrecht University in the group of Stefan Rüdiger, she did a postdoc at Peter Walter’s lab at the University of California San Francisco. In her lab, they combine cell biology and biochemistry to dissect how cells maintain protein-folding homeostasis in the ER. Her long-term goal is to use the mechanistic insights derived from these approaches to restore protein homeostasis in variety human diseases caused by protein misfolding.

Christiane Kerscher, LI-COR Biosciences GmbH, DE

Christiane Kerscher

Christiane Kerscher, PhD

Senior Solutions & Support Scientist

Johannes Kirchmair, University of Vienna, AT

Johannes Kirchmair

Johannes Kirchmair is an associate professor in cheminformatics at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry of the University of Vienna. After earning his PhD from the University of Innsbruck (2007), Johannes started his career as an application scientist at Inte:Ligand GmbH (Vienna). In 2010 he joined BASF SE (Ludwigshafen) as a postdoctoral research fellow. Thereafter he worked as a research associate at the University of Cambridge (2010-2013) and ETH Zurich (2013-2014). Johannes held a junior professorship in applied bioinformatics at the University of Hamburg (2014 to 2018) and an associate professorship in bioinformatics at the University of Bergen (2018 to 2019). He has been a visiting professor or lecturer at the National Institute of Warangal (2016), the University of Cagliari (2017) and the University of Vienna (2018). His main research interests include the development and application of computational methods for the prediction of the biological activities, metabolic fate and toxicity of small molecules in the context of drug discovery.

Dimitri Krainc, Northwestern University, US

Dimitri Krainc

Dimitri Krainc, MD, PhD currently serves as the Aaron Montgomery Ward Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurology and Director of the Center for Neurogenetics at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. Previously, Dr. Krainc spent more than 20 years at Harvard Medical School where he completed his research and clinical training and served on the neurology faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School until 2013 when he relocated to Chicago. Informed by genetic causes of disease, his lab has studied converging mechanisms across different neurodegenerative disorders that have led to the development of targeted therapies and innovative clinical trials. His group has made impactful contributions to the understanding of Huntington’s disease pathogenesis that led to novel therapeutic strategies (Science, 2002; Cell, 2004; Cell 2006; Cell, 2009, Nature Medicine, 2011). They discovered a mechanism that links Parkinson's (PD) and Gaucher’s diseases via lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (Cell, 2011) that led to development of targeted therapeutics (Science Translational Medicine, 2019). His team also uncovered novel converging lysosomal and mitochondrial mechanisms in various forms of PD that were observed only in human neurons, but not in mouse models (Science, 2017), providing a platform for improved translation of preclinical studies in PD. Their recent discovery of direct contacts between mitochondria and lysosomes (Nature, 2018) has fundamental implications for elucidating the role of organelle dynamics in physiological and pathological cellular functions. His work is currently funded by the Javits Award, as well as several other NIH and foundation grants. Dr. Krainc is the principal founder of two biotech companies, in Boston and Chicago, focused on therapeutic development for neurodegenerative diseases.

Andreas Ladurner, LMU Munich, DE

Andreas Ladurner

Our research focuses on three complementary areas of chromatin plasticity. We dissect the structure and function of important chromatin remodelling enzymes using a combination of high-resolution methods, biochemistry, protein engineering, cellular and in vivo approaches, especially in the contest of PARP signaling and DNA repair. We also study the biological role and cell biology of nuclear and mitochondrial ADP-ribosylation, a post-translational modification involved in regulating chromatin structure, DNA transcription and DNA replication upon environmental stresses. We have pioneered the discovery of ADP-ribose-sensing macrodomain proteins. Finally, we complement our studies in yeast and mammalian cells by studying the role of nutrients and metabolites in gene regulation, both in mammals and in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By applying knowledge from the field of transcription and metabolism, we are dissecting how specific cellular metabolites bind and regulate transcription factors that allow organisms to adapt to nutrients.

Our approach is defined by a multidisciplinary combination of genetics, genomics, biochemistry, cell biology, biophysics, structural biology (X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM) and the use of selected model organisms. This allows us to answer fundamental biological questions in chromatin and PARP biology and to identify, dissect and translate novel paradigms of molecular recognition and biological regulation.

Diether Lambrechts, KU Leuven, BE

Diether Lambrechts

Prof. Diether Lambrechts is group leader in the VIB Center for Cancer Biology (CCB) at VIB and Full Professor at the University of Leuven, Belgium. He is heading the Laboratory for Translational Genetics and in his research he aspires to tackle important questions in oncology by translating genome-scale data sets into clinically applicable knowledge. Hismajor focus is to characterize how the tumor micro-environment (TME) determines tumor behavior and response to anti-angiogenic and checkpoint immunotherapies, which are both frequently used in the clinic (alone or in combination). This exciting and actual research line bears a lot of translational potential, as managing the levels of hypoxia in solid tumors by anti-angiogenic strategies represents a major yet incompletely understood challenge, while the field of immunotherapy is rapidly expanding – yet desperately in need of biomarkers predicting clinical response. To tackle these research interests, his group is currently using the newest single-cell profiling technologies to study TMEs at the greatest detail.

Thomas A. Leonard, Max Perutz Labs, AT

Thomas A. Leonard

Thomas studied Biochemistry at the University of Bristol, U.K. before obtaining a PhD in Structural Biology at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. Thomas moved to the USA in 2005 as an EMBO postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD and started his own lab as an independent investigator at the Max Perutz Labs in 2012. He is currently Deputy Head of the Center for Medical Biochemistry at the Max Perutz Labs and Curriculum Director of a new Master course in Molecular Precision Medicine, which is a joint venture of the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Vienna. Thomas’ research group is primarily focused on how signals are propagated in the cell, with a particular emphasis on how lipid second messengers are transduced into appropriate downstream responses with high fidelity and acute spatiotemporal control. This has wide implications in both human physiology and pathology, since the dysregulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction pathways is a hallmark of many human diseases, including cancer, overgrowth and metabolic disorders, and neurological pathologies.

Helder Maiato, i3S- Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, PT

Helder Maiato

Helder Maiato graduated in Biochemistry and holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Porto. He was a visiting PhD student at the University of Edinburgh (UK) and a Post-doctoral Research Affiliate at the New York State Department of Health (USA). At present, he is Coordinating Investigator at the Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3S) and Invited Full Professor at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto. He authored more than 100 scientific publications, including seminal contributions, and has been invited to give seminars in more than 20 different countries, including major conferences in the field. His main research interest is the spatiotemporal control of chromosome segregation during cell division and he has been the coordinator of two projects (Starting+Consolidator) from the European Research Council. Between 2012-2015 he served as National Counsellor for Science and Technology to the Portuguese Prime Minister. In 2015 he was honoured with the Young Investigator Award from the Louis-Jeantet Foundation (among ERC awardees), was elected EMBO Member in 2016 and was recognized with the Excellence in Scientific Research Award by the University of Porto in 2019. Together with his wife (a child psychologist), they founded Yscience (www.yscience.pt), a pilot project that brings together scientists to promote science education and the scientific method in young children.

Susana Minguet, Universtiy of Freiburg, DE

Susana Minguet

Susana Minguet is group leader in the Department of Immunology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg. Her group merges expertises in molecular immunology, synthetic immunology and cancer with a strong focus on T-cell immunology. Her vision is to integrate basic immunological research with clinical-orientated challenges to translate basic research findings into clinical applications. Our main goal is to understand how T cells are activated to develop novel avenues to improve T-cell immunotherapies against cancer. 

Simone Moser, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, DE

Simone Moser

Simone Moser studied chemistry at the University of Innsbruck, Austria and received her PhD in 2009 under the supervision of Prof. Bernhard Kräutler, working on the structure elucidation of phyllobilins. She then pursued postdoctoral studies with Prof. Kai Johnsson at EPFL, Switzerland and Prof. Elizabeth M. Nolan at MIT, USA  in the fields of target identification and mode of action studies of small molecules and peptides. After one year in Analytical Development in the pharmaceutical industry (Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals, Novartis), she returned to academia and is now a group leader at the Department of Pharmacy at LMU Munich. Her research interests lie at the interface of chemistry and biology, with the focus on the bioactivities of phyllobilins.

Mathias Munschauer, Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research, DE

Mathias Munschauer

Mathias Munschauer started working with RNA and RNA-binding proteins as an undergraduate student in the lab of Thomas Tuschl at Rockefeller University, where he later completed his master’s thesis. He then joined an international PhD exchange program jointly operated by the Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin (working with Markus Landthaler) and at New York University (working with Christine Vogel). In the Landthaler lab, Mathias Munschauer pioneered technologies to capture the mRNA-bound proteome and display its global protein occupancy pattern on protein coding transcripts for the first time. For his postdoctoral research, he joined the lab of Eric Lander at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, where he focused on dissecting lncRNA-associated protein complexes. He joined the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) in 2019 as head of his independent Helmholtz Young Investigator Group. In 2021, he was appointed a Junior Professor at the Faculty of Medicine at Wuerzburg University.

Per Nilsson, Karolinska Institutet, SE

Per Nilsson

I am working on finding the molecular underpinnings of Alzheimer’s disease. My background is a PhD in molecular biotechnology from Uppsala University, Sweden. I did my postdoc at RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Japan. Since 2016 I am heading a research group at Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, where I am also Vice/Acting Head of Division of Neurogeriatrics. Our research is focused on preclinical studies using animal models of Alzheimer’s in combination with clinical studies. The research is very much focused on protein homeostasis and the role of autophagy in amyloid β and tau metabolism and their links to neurodegeneration.

Gaia Novarino, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, AT

Gaia Novarino

Gaia Novarino, an Italian native, received her PhD degree in Developmental Biology from the University of Rome La Sapienza (Italy).  During her PhD she moved to Germany to join the Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine where she focused on the study of chloride transporters associated with human genetic disorders. In 2010 she moved to San Diego to do her postdoc at the School of Medicine of University of California San Diego where she studied the genetics of neurodevelopmental disorders. In 2014 she joined the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria, first as Assistant Professor and then as Full Professor. She is a FENS-Kavli Network of Excellence scholar, an ERC grant holder and a Simons foundation Investigator. In 2016 Gaia won the prestigious Boehringer Ingelheim FENS Research Award for her research on molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodevelopmental disorders. Since 2021 is the Vice Presidents for Science Education at IST Austria. Gaia research interest lies in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Christiane A. Opitz, German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, DE

Christiane A. Opitz

Christiane Opitz’s research focusses on metabolic signaling through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Her laboratory investigates how this pathways regulate tumor cell intrinsic malignant properties as well as anti-tumor immunity.

The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was initially discovered as the mediator of the toxic effects of xenobiotic pollutants such as dioxin. Christiane Opitz identified tryptophan (Trp) catabolites as endogenous agonists of the AHR and demonstrated that they enhance tumor cell motility and suppress anti-tumor immunity. Her work formed a basis for the development of small molecule inhibitors of the AHR and of the Trp-degrading enzymes Trp-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2) and interleukin-4-induced 1 (IL4I1) for cancer immunotherapy. AHR target gene expression is widely used as a readout for AHR activity. However, as AHR target gene expression is cell type- and ligand-specific, analysis of a few classical AHR target genes cannot reliably detect AHR activity across different tissues. Christiane Opitz and her team have developed a transcriptional pan-tissue AHR signature, which can detect AHR activity and the biological functions of the induced target genes irrespective of tissue and ligand and they are exploring this signature for patient stratification and treatment monitoring for therapies that modulate AHR activity, which includes immunotherapies.

Tiago Outeiro, University Medical Center Goettingen, DE

Tiago Outeiro

Prof. Tiago Outeiro graduated in Biochemistry at the University of Porto and was an Erasmus student at the University of Leeds in the UK. Prof. Outeiro did his PhD thesis at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical research – MIT. Prof. Outeiro was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Neurology of the Massachusetts General Hospital – Harvard Medical School and then directed the Cell and Molecular Neuroscience Unit at IMM, Lisbon, from 2007 to 2014. Currently, Prof. Outeiro is Full Professor and the Director of the Department of Experimental Neurodegeneration at the University Medical Center Goettingen, in Germany. Prof. Outeiro holds a joint Professor position at Newcastle University in the UK. 

Jean-Baptiste Penigault, nanoString, FR

Jean-Baptiste Penigault

Spatially resolved transcriptomics and proteomics are already revolutionizing the requiring activity of biomarker discovery for Cancer, Neuro Degenerative Diseases and Transplantation. It also holds the promise to help identifying the elusive intrinsic and extrinsic biomarkers for Cell therapies. nanoString with its GeoMx and future Spatial Molecular Imager is offering key instrumentations that helps automate the process with robustness and ergonomics, allowing its customer to rapidly publish their findings and medicine to progress by leap

Josef Penninger, Life Sciences Institute, CA

Josef Penninger

Josef Martin Penninger, born in Gurten, Austria, is a world-renowned geneticist and the Canada 150 Research Chair in Functional Genetics. Dr. Penninger is currently the Director of the Life Sciences Institute (LSI) at the University of British Columbia. He studied medicine at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. From 1990 to 1994 he worked as post-doctoral fellow at the Ontario Cancer Institute, thereafter until 2002 at the Department of Immunology and Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. As Principal Investigator of Amgen, his independent lab contributed to the development of the antibody Denosumab for bone loss and also found the first connection for RANKL to mammary gland development in pregnancy and breast cancer. In 2002, he moved to Vienna, Austria to start and develop the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), which has become one of the prime research centers in the world. Dr. Penninger envisions to recreate this environment at the LSI to nurture and train the best and brightest young minds of UBC scholars. His major accomplishments include pioneering insights into the molecular basis of osteoporosis and breast cancer, and demonstrating a critical role for ACE2 as the cellular receptor for the SARS Coronavirus infections and linking ACE2 to lung failure in such infections.  He has published extensively in several multidisciplinary scientific journals, with over 60 publications in Cell, Nature, and Science. Josef has received numerous awards including the Wittgenstein Prize of the Austrian Federal Government, the Descartes Prize for Research, the Ernst Jung Prize for Medical Excellence, the Innovator Award of the US Department of Defense, and the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and Art First Class.

Benjamin Salzer, Children\'s Cancer Research Institute, AT

Benjamin Salzer

Benjamin Salzer studied Medical Biotechnology at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna, with a PhD in “Biomolecular Technology of Proteins”. Currently, he is a postdoctoral fellow in the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Next Generation of CAR T cells at the Children’s Cancer Research Institute, Vienna. His research interests focus on cancer immunotherapy using CAR T cells. In his work, he is harnessing the tools of synthetic biology and protein engineering to enhance the therapeutic potential of engineered immune cells.

Bernd Schmeck, Philipps-University Marburg, DE

Bernd Schmeck

Bernd Schmeck is a full professor for Molecular Pneumology and Infectious Diseases at the University of Marburg, Germany, head of the Institute for Lung Research and the Clinic for Airway Infections at the University Medical Center. He is a member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), the German Center for Infectious Diseases Research (DZIF), and the Marburg Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO). He has been appointed Adjunct Faculty of the Institute for Lung Health in Giessen, where he oversees the area of Extracellular Vesicles.

Bernd Schmeck studied medicine in Giessen and Berlin. After a research stay at King´s College London he pursuit and finished his doctoral thesis with distinction at Humboldt University Berlin. In 2003, he received a research scholarship for pneumonia research. He was visiting scientist at the Johns-Hopkins-University, Baltimore, and Postdoc in lung research at the Charité Medical School in Berlin. In 2008, he was appointed head of the BMBF Junior Research Group “Systems biology of Lung Inflammation”. In 2011, he was appointed full professor at Marburg University, 2013 funding director of the Institute for Lung Research, and 2020 head of the Clinic for Airway Infection. Currently, he his speaker of the LOEWE consortium “Diffusible Signals” (Impact of diffusible signals at human cell-microbe interfaces), and the European ERACoSysMed consortium “Sysmed COPD”. He is project leader of the transregional DFG-Collaborative Research Center “Innate Immunity of the Lung” (SFB/TR84) and faculty member of the international Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) “Principles of Microbial Life: From molecules to cells, from cells to interactions (µLife)”.

The Schmeck lab focuses on the intercellular communication between different host cell types and also bacterial cells in lung parenchyma inflammation, specifically addressing extracellular vesicles from host cell and bacterial origin, their generation, content, uptake, and function.

Tim Skern, Medical University of Vienna, AT

Tim Skern

I studied biochemistry in Liverpool and London, followed by post-docs in Vienna and Strasbourg. I have worked at the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna since 1991 as a lecturer and then professor. My research has centered on the biochemical and structural properties of viral proteins from human rhinoviruses, foot-and-mouth disease virus, West Nile virus and vaccinia virus using virological and structural biology techniques. I have also taught biochemistry and virology as well as scientific English and have written books on each of these subjects.

I have been Editor-in-Chief of Archives of Virology since January 2018, a member of the FEBS fellowships committee since 2017 and a member of the ICTV study group on picornaviruses since 1996.

Christine Strasser, Carl Zeiss, CH

Christine Strasser

Christine studied Biology and did her PhD in Constance, Germany. During that time, she worked intensively with ZEISS confocal microscopes
and also trained users in the newly founded BioImaging Center.
She has been working for ZEISS in Switzerland since 2010 and is responsible as an application specialist for Confocal- and Lightsheet- systems in Switzerland, Austria and South Eastern Europe.

Stefan Terlecki-Zaniewicz, St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute, AT

Stefan Terlecki-Zaniewicz

Stefan Terlecki-Zaniewicz studied Molecular Biotechnology at the University of Applied Sciences in Vienna. During his PhD studies, he investigated oncogenic mechanisms of leukemogenic fusion proteins in the group of Prof. Florian Grebien. One of the main discoveries was that the family of Nucleoporin 98 fusion proteins are involved in biomolecular condensation, which seems to be an important mechanism in leukemia development. Currently he is working in the laboratory of Eleni Tomazou at the St. Anna Children’s Cancer Research Institute. There he is interested in another family of oncogenic fusion proteins, leading to sarcoma in children and young adults.

Iva Tolić, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR

Iva Tolić

Iva Tolić is a Professor of Biology and Senior Research Group Leader with tenure at the Ruđer Bošković Institute in Zagreb, Croatia. She graduated in molecular biology from the University of Zagreb. Her PhD work on cell mechanics was done with Prof. Ning Wang at Harvard. Afterwards, she did a postdoc in cell biophysics with Prof. Kirstine Berg-Sørensen at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, and later with Prof. Francesco Pavone at LENS - European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, in Florence, Italy. From 2004 until 2014 she worked as a Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany. In 2015, she returned to her hometown Zagreb. Her research areas are biophysics of the spindle in mitosis and meiosis, microtubules and motor proteins.

Iva is a recipient of the prestigious grants funded by the European Research Council (ERC), Consolidator and Synergy. She has been elected to EMBO membership. In 2014, she was chosen by the journal Cell as one of 40 scientists from around the world and working in diverse biological fields, "40 under 40". She received numerous awards including the Ignaz Lieben Award of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, European Biophysical Societies Association (EBSA) Young Investigators' Medal and Prize, European Life Science Award in the category Investigator of the Year, Croatian Women of Influence Award, and National Science Award of the Republic of Croatia.

Saskia Trump, Berlin Institute of Health at Charité, DE

Saskia Trump

Saskia Trump is deputy head of the Molecular Epidemiology Department at the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité. Trained as an analytical chemist, she became interested in mechanism of disease early on. As an assistant professor at the Colorado Health Sciences Center, she worked on pulmonary hypertension and has since studied various aspects of respiratory disease, particularly in children.

The prenatal period is particularly vulnerable to environmental exposures, and exposure at early stages of development can have long-term consequences for children's health. Using a variety of birth cohorts, we are investigating how prenatal exposure contributes to adverse childhood development, primarily affecting the respiratory system. Patient cohorts also allow us to elucidate the different pathological aspects of respiratory diseases in more detail. Our focus on epigenetic mechanisms that mediate disease development, allowed us to be among the first to apply whole-genome methyl-sequencing in cohort studies.  My current research focuses on the role of epithelial-immune cell interactions contributing to lung injury.

Bas van Steensel, Netherlands Cancer Institute, NL

Bas van Steensel

Bas van Steensel obtained his PhD at the University of Amsterdam, where he studied steroid receptor biology and nuclear architecture. After postdoctoral fellowships in the labs of Titia de Lange (the Rockefeller University) and Steven Henikoff (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) he established his laboratory in 2001 at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, where he is now Head of the Division of Gene Regulation. He is also Adjunct Professor at the Department of Cell Biology at Erasmus University Medical Centre in Rotterdam, full member of the Oncode Institute and EMBO Member.

BvS' research focuses on the general principles of genome architecture and chromatin organization, with emphasis on functions such as gene regulation and DNA repair. His lab develops new genomics methods, mostly based on next generation sequencing. Among these are DamID and related technologies, which are used to map and visualize chromatin compartmentalization inside the nucleus. His lab also developed TRIP, a method to measure the impact of chromatin on gene regulation and DNA repair at thousands of genomic locations in parallel; SuRE, a method for functional mapping of regulatory elements in the entire human genome; and TIDE(R) for measuring the efficiency of genome editing tools such as CRISPR/Cas9.

Stepanka Vanacova, Masaryk University, CZ

Stepanka Vanacova

 

I am an Associate Professor at the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC) at the Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. After receiving my Ph.D. in Parasitology from Charles Universit in Prague I spent three years at UCLA as a postdoctoral researcher in the group of Patricia J. Johnson studying pre-mRNA splicing and transcription regulation in the human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. The next four years I was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the group of Walter Keller at Biozentrum, University of Basel, Switzerland, investigating polyadenylation-mediated RNA surveillance pathway in the yeast nucleus. In 2008 I established my own group at the Masaryk University, which mostly focuses on the molecular mechanisms of internal and 3' terminal RNA modifications in yeast and mammalian cells.

Marit Westerterp, University Medical Center Groningen, NL

Marit Westerterp

Marit Westerterp is Associate Professor at the University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands. Her work focuses on the crosstalk between lipids and inflammation, and specifically on the role of cholesterol efflux pathways, mediated by the cholesterol transporters ATP Binding Cassette A1 and G1. She has shown that these cholesterol efflux pathways suppress inflammasome activation, leading to decreased formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in atherosclerotic plaques, and amelioration of an auto-immune phenotype. Dr Westerterp was a recipient of the Roger Davis Award (2015), and the Daniel Steinberg and Irvine Page Awards (2017) and serves on the Editorial Boards of Circulation Research and Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. Her current research is focused on the role of cholesterol efflux pathways in T-cells in atherogenesis.

Charlotte Zajc, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, AT

Charlotte Zajc

Charlotte Zajc completed her master studies in Medical Biotechnology at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU) in Vienna in 2015, and her doctoral studies at the St. Anna Children´s Cancer Research Institute (CCRI) under supervision of Manfred Lehner in 2020. During her PhD, she spent 6 months as a visiting researcher at the Stanford School of Medicine in the laboratory of Kara Davis. Charlotte Zajc is currently employed as a postdoctoral fellow in the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Next Generation of CAR T cells at the Department of Chemistry (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences). Her research interests are at the interface of protein engineering and immunology with the main focus on safety engineering of cellular therapies such as CAR T cells. The ambition of Charlotte Zajc is to use methods and tools of the protein engineering toolbox to enhance the potency of CAR T cells and unravel the full potential of this novel therapy.

Marin Barisic, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, DK

Marin Barisic

Marin Barisic earned his Diploma in Molecular Biology at the University of Zagreb in Croatia, and his PhD in Molecular Cell Biology and Oncology at the Innsbruck Medical University, under supervision of Stephan Geley. After finishing his Postdoc in the lab of Helder Maiato at the Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology in Porto, he started his own research group as a Group Leader in the Cell Division and Cytoskeleton laboratory at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center (DCRC) in Copenhagen, Denmark. Marin's work is based on investigation of molecular mechanisms behind chromosomal and cytoskeletal dynamics, with a special focus on the roles of motor proteins and tubulin post-translational modifications.

Georg Casari, Haplogen GmbH, AT

Georg CasariNo Biosketch submitted.

Theresia Dunzendorfer-Matt, Innsbruck Medical University, AT

Theresia Dunzendorfer-Matt

Theresia Dunzendorfer-Matt studied Chemistry at the University of Innsbruck, followed by a PhD in Biochemistry (2001) working on proteins involved in signal transduction pathways of oncogenic transcription factors. Theresia then joined the lab of Peter Wright at The Scripps Research Institute (La Jolla, CA) as a Schrödinger postdoctoral fellow to investigate enzymatic function and interaction partners of a giant transcriptional regulator protein using NMR spectroscopy and biochemical techniques. After a break she resumed her scientific work at the Medical University of Innsbruck where she is now a Staff Scientist at the Institute of Biological Chemistry. Current research interests include the structural and enzymatic characterization of the large RasGAP neurofibromin and complexes formed with its natural binding partners. Malfunction of neurofibromin causes rare but severe diseases and is also involved in the development of human cancers.

Frank Edenhofer, University Innsbruck, AT

Frank EdenhoferNo Biosketch submitted.

Matthias Erlacher, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Matthias Erlacher

At the Institute of Genomics and RNomics we are studying various aspects of RNA biology. One focus is to dissect molecular mechanisms of protein synthesis, by employing natural and non-natural modified RNAs.

Hesso Farhan, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Hesso Farhan

I studied medicine in Vienna, where I also performed my doctoral thesis. Afterwards, I went for a postdoc to the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 2011 I started my own lab at the Biotechnology Institut Thurgau at the University of Konstanz. I was then recruited at a professor to the University of Oslo in Norway. As of 2021, I am the director of the Institute of Pathophysiology at the Medical University of Innsbruck in Austria. My lab focuses on secretory membrane trafficking and the regulation of cellular proteostasis by signaling.

Heidelinde Fiegl, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, AT

Heidelinde Fiegl

Heidelinde Fiegl is a molecular biologist and lecturer in Experimental Gynecology at the Medical University of Innsbruck (MUI), Austria. After completing her PhD studies at the Leopold-Franzens-University (LFU) in Innsbruck, she started working as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the MUI in 2001. In 2005, she moved to the University College London and in 2006 to the Tyrolean Cancer Research Institute (TKFI) in Innsbruck. During this time, she studied DNA methylation aberrations in female malignancies intensively.

In 2007, she returned to the MUI and established a research group at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology focusing on the role of epigenetics and translational research in breast and gynecological cancers. In 2008, she became a lecturer in experimental gynecology, since 2010, she is the head of the Laboratory for clinical biochemistry at this department and since 2014 she is Associate Professor. 

Beside her lecturing activities at the MUI, her scientific work now focuses on identifying biomarkers to facilitate risk prediction and individualization of cancer treatment in female malignancies. She is a member of the Austrian biobank network BBMRI.AT (Biobanking and BioMolecular resources Research Infrastructure Austria) and is involved in harmonizing quality management in biobanking. She has authored of over 90 scientific publications in international journals and books.

Francesca Finotello, University of Innsbruck, AT

Francesca Finotello

Francesca Finotello earned her PhD in Bioengineering in 2014 at the University of Padova, Italy. She has longstanding expertise in multi-omics data analysis, and she is interested in the development of new computational biology methods to advance cancer immunology and precision medicine. At present, she is a principal investigator and appointed Assistant Professor in Bioinformatics in the Institute of Molecular Biology of the University of Innsbruck, Austria. She performs integrative analyses of bulk and single-cell multi-omics using bioinformatics and systems biology methodologies. By characterizing the landscape of cancer neoantigens, the composition of the tumor immune contexture, and the intricate multi-cellular crosstalk governing tumor-immune-stromal cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment, she aims at extracting mechanistic rationale to improve cancer immunotherapy.

Stephan Geley, Innsbruck Medical University, AT

Stephan Geley

I obtained my MD at University of Innsbruck with a thesis on immunoglobulin genetics. During my first postdoctoral training, I worked with Reinhard Kofler on glucocorticoid induced apoptosis after which I joined Tim Hunt’s lab at the ICRF/Cancer Research UK, London, to work on cell cycle regulated proteolysis. After my return to Innsbruck I set up my own research group which focuses on the regulation of mitosis, ubiquitin dependent proteolysis, cyclin dependent kinases and more recently also on nuclear RNA degradation.

Walter Glaser, ÖGMBT, AT

Walter Glaser

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Johanna Gostner, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Johanna Gostner

Johanna Gostner is biologist by training, holds a PhD in genetics, habilitated in biochemistry and is approved as European Registered Toxicologist. She studied in Salzburg and worked at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, the Tyrolean Cancer Research Institute, and expanded her expertise through a stint at the research powerhouse of Imperial College London, from where she moved back to Innsbruck to build up an independent junior research group at the Institute of Medical Biochemistry, Medical University of Innsbruck.

Her research is focused on immunometabolism and biochemical toxicology, with a particular interest in signaling processes that are affected by external factors such as diet and pollution. Specific projects range from respiratory toxicology, risk-benefit assessment of natural products to the effects of stressors on immunobiochemistry.

Christoph Griesbeck, MCI-The Entrepreneurial School, AT

Christoph Griesbeck

After my PhD in Biochemistry in the field of bacterial energy metabolism at the University of Regensburg (Hauska lab) I joined Peter Hegemann´s group for working on molecular biological methods with eukaryotic microalgae, namely Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This led me to the Center of Excellence for Fluorescent Bioanalysis located at the Biopark Regensburg, where I was lab head for Biotechnology and working on the development of molecular biological kits and expression systems. In 2006 I joined MCI Innsbruck to establish the field and study programs in Biotechnology. As Department head I am responsible for the Bachelor´s program in Biotechnology & Food Engineering as well as for the Master´s program in Biotechnology. Since 2020 I am the coordinator for the Innovation Hub Food, Biotechnology & Circular Economy for the European University alliance Ulysseus comprising the universities of Sevilla, Genova, Cote d`Azur, TU Kosice, Haaga Helia Helsinki and MCI.

Sebastian Herzog, Medical University Innsbruck, AT

Sebastian Herzog

I have studied Biology at the University of Freiburg and have been trained as a Molecular Immunologist at the Max-Planck-Institute of Immunobiology under guidance of Michael Reth and Hassan Jumaa, mainly focusing on lymphocyte development and signaling. In my postdoctoral studies, I have extended my research focus to the role of non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs, in the immune system. Since 2013, I work as a Group Leader in the Institute of Developmental Immunology in Innsbruck. My team is still interested how microRNAs impact on the immune system both under physiological conditions as well as in oncogenic settings. However, we also try to understand how microRNAs themselves are controlled, e.g. during their biogenesis, to fulfill their role as an additional layer of precise gene regulation.

Markus Keller, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Markus Keller

Markus Keller studied chemistry at the Leopold Franzens University in Innsbruck. During his PhD studies at the Institute for Biological Chemistry of the Medical University of Innsbruck, he intensively investigated the changes in the lipid balance in the rare inherited disease Sjögren Larsson Syndrome and was able to contribute significantly to the structural and biochemical elucidation of the associated metabolic pathways. As PostDoc Markus Keller studied the regulation, evolution, and origin of metabolic networks at the University of Cambridge (UK) funded by an Schrödinger scholarship. Since 2016 Markus Keller is working as a group leader at the Institute for Human Genetics at the Medical University of Innsbruck, where he researches the mechanisms of hereditary metabolic disorders of the mitochondria and strategies for their treatment.

Natascha Kleiter, Medical University Innsbruck, AT

Natascha Kleiter

Natascha Kleiter (Hermann-Kleiter) is Associate Professor at the Medical University in Innsbruck, Austria, with extensive expertise in T cell biology. Her main focus is to reveal T cell-intrinsic mechanisms involved in the loss of tolerance during autoimmune or anti-cancer responses. Her recent work involved functional analysis of the nuclear orphan receptor NR2F6 in CD4 T cells during follicular T helper cell differentiation and CD8 memory formation following bacterial infection. Her research involves in vivo mouse models resembling human diseases combined with molecular and cellular technologies to identify underlying mechanisms.

Verena Labi, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Verena Labi

Verena Labi (ORCID ID: 0000-0001-7538-1520) studied microbiology at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. During her PhD she identified key roles for the BH3-only proteins BIM and BMF in lymphocyte development and the prevention of autoimmunity and cancer (ÖAW fellow). During this time, she also pinpointed apoptosis as a driver of lymphoma under conditions of immune cell attrition. Further studies suggest that blocking apoptosis may be a viable option to treat certain cancers and aid hematopoietic stem cell transplantation regimens. After her PhD studies she left Innsbruck to Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA where she started a postdoc on transcriptional (DNA demethylation) and post-transcriptional (microRNAs) control mechanisms of B cell development and function (EMBO fellow). She revealed that the epigenetic TET enzymes, initiators of DNA demethylation, are vital for the establishment of B lymphocyte identity. In further studies, she explored the roles of the miR-17-92 microRNAs in B lymphocyte selection in the bone marrow, and she identified the binding of miR-17-92 microRNAs to its target gene Bim as vital for embryonic development. Finishing her postoc involved a transatlantic move of the lab from Boston to the MDC Berlin, Germany. In 2015 Verena became a junior group leader at the Institute of Developmental Immunology, Medical University of Innsbruck, and has been granted tenure in 2019. Using genetic mouse models and human/murine cell culture systems her research group focuses on molecular control mechanisms of cell fitness and fate decisions in the hematopoietic system. In two independent projects, her lab recently uncovered that the DNA damage response gene CHK1 and the epigenetic TET enzymes TET2 and TET3 are key for efficient humoral immunity.

Alexandra Lusser, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Alexandra Lusser

After obtaining my PhD at the University of Innsbruck on the study of plant histone deacetylases, I moved to the lab of Jim Kadonaga (University of California San Diego) for a postdoctoral fellowship working on ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors. In my own laboratory at the Medical University of Innsbruck my group is interested to learn about the establishment, maintenance and modification of eukaryotic chromatin structure. We are approaching this question by studying the molecular mechanisms and biological context of ATP-dependent chromatin assembly and remodeling and of variant histone assembly.

More recently, we also became interested in “epigenetic” mechanisms at the mRNA level. In particular, we study mRNA base modifications, such a 5-methylcytosine, and their potential roles for mRNA metabolism.

Herbert Oberacher, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Herbert Oberacher

Herbert Oberacher is an analytical chemist. In 2002 he received his PhD at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. After spending a year as postdoctoral fellow at the University of the Saarland, Germany, he got a position as senior researcher at the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Innsbruck Medical University, Austria. In 2007 he received the “venia docendi” for bioanalysis, and in 2011 he was appointed as Associate Professor. His research focuses on the development of new and advanced techniques for the analysis of bioorganic molecules with special emphasis on small molecules and nucleic acids. Typical fields of application include medical, biological, pharmaceutical, and environmental research. For this research, he received several awards. He has (co-)authored more than 120 publications in international scientific journals and holds three patents.

Nadine J. Ortner, University of Innsbruck, AT

Nadine J. Ortner

I have studied Molecular Biology with special focus on Neurosciences at the University of Vienna (Diploma Program, 2006-2012) and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Innsbruck (PhD Program, 2012-2017). During my PhD I focused on the pharmacology of brain L-type calcium channels (with special focus on subtype-selective inhibitors) and their implication for the treatment of brain diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Currently I am characterizing and validating a novel Cav1.3 channelopathy mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Combining my expertise in neurobiology and pharmacology, I aim at deciphering the role of voltage-gated calcium channels in brain disorders and their pharmacological modulation as a potential therapeutic intervention. For my studies I employ molecular (cloning, generation of stable cell lines), electrophysiological (heterologous expression systems & brain slices), immunohistochemical and pharmacological methods.

Andreas Pircher, Medical University Innsbruck, AT

Andreas Pircher

Andreas completed his studies in medicine and his PhD at the Medical University of Innsbruck/Austria, where he is currently consultant and vice-chair of the Thoracic Oncology Program as well as lead of the Translational Research Program at the Department for Hematology and Oncology. He is particularly focusing on basic-oriented research with translational aspects going alongside clinical care and trials. Andreas is strongly interested in the biology of tumor endothelial cells and pathological tumor angiogenesis. As Post-Doc in Peter Carmeliet’s he further developed his research focus and interest. At the moment Andreas tries to coordinate clinical studies incorporating single cell RNA sequencing studies to deeper characterise the tumor microenvironment and understand therapeutic resistance mechanisms.

Ulrike Rehbein, University of Innsbruck, AT

Ulrike Rehbein

Dr. Ulrike Rehbein, currently postdoctoral scientist in the lab of Prof. Dr. Kathrin Thedieck in Innsbruck, obtained her dual PhD degree in Biology at the University Medical Center of Groningen (UMCG), the Netherlands and the Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Germany. During her PhD she focused on identifying and characterizing novel molecular mechanisms and interactors regulating the metabolic master regulator MTOR kinase. Now in Innsbruck, she investigates the crosstalk of metabolic signaling and mRNA stability and its implication in diseases such as neurological disorders and cancer.

Rüdiger Schweigreiter, Innsbruck Medical University, AT

Rüdiger Schweigreiter

I studied life sciences and did my master thesis at the IMP in Vienna in the group of Gerhard Christofori. The work was on caspases and their role in proliferation of murine cancer cells. During my master thesis it became clear to me that I wanted to make my career in neuroscience. For the PhD I went to Munich to the Max-Planck-Institute of Neurobiology joining the group of Yves-Alain Barde who at that time had just started to work on the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. When my supervisor was appointed Director of the FMI in Basel, I followed him to finish my PhD thesis and add a short postdoc in Switzerland. Still in Munich, I had started to collaborate with Christine E. Bandtlow on myelin-associated mechanisms of neurite outgrowth inhibition. When later on Christine offered me a position in her lab in Innsbruck I was happy to move to this lovely Alpine resort. While in the beginning my focus was on myelin-associated inhibitors of neurite growth, I more recently  developed an interest in molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern the regenerative growth of peripheral nerve fibers. In parallel my attention has been drawn to the considerable metabolic strain neurons are subjected to throughout their decade-long life and its implications for neurodegenerative diseases.    

Kathrin Thedieck, University of Innsbruck, AT

Kathrin Thedieck

Kathrin Thedieck is Professor and Institute Head of Biochemistry at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. Her research spans the field of metabolic signaling with a focus on networks converging on the metabolic master regulator mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and phosphoinositide-3 kinases (PI3Ks). Her group pioneers crosstalk of PI3K-mTOR with RNA-protein networks, and systems studies of mTOR network topology as well as its responses to metabolism and therapy. She coordinates and partners European and national consortia that develop systems approaches for precision medicine in cancer and in congenital diseases. Are you curious about Kathrin Thedieck’s research? Find out more on www.metabolic-signaling.eu

Martin Tollinger, University of Innsbruck, AT

Martin Tollinger

Martin Tollinger performed his PhD thesis in protein NMR spectroscopy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. He then was a post-doc at the University of Toronto, Canada, specializing on methods development and protein folding and stability measurements by solution NMR. After his post-doc, he completed his Venia Docendi  in Biophysical Chemistry and Structural Biology at the University of Vienna, before moving to the University of Innsbruck (Institute of Organic Chemistry), where he currently leads the biomolecular protein NMR group. His prime interests are functional protein dynamics, protein food allergens and, more recently, RNA chaperones.

Katrin Watschinger, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Katrin Watschinger

After my studies of chemistry at the Innsbruck University and my PhD on neuronal calcium channels I continued my scientific curriculum at the Medical University of Innsbruck in the field of ether lipids, In 2010, I discovered the genetic identity of alkylglycerol monooxygenase (AGMO). With an Erwin-Schrödinger fellowship from the FWF I spent 12 months at the University of Oxford where I was able to launch the generation of the so far only Agmo knockout mouse which is now established in my lab. Recently, we could identify also the gene coding for plasmanylethanolamine desaturase (PEDS1), another orphan enzyme in ether lipid metabolism. This finding now allows us to dissect the roles of different types of ether lipids, the plasmalogens and plasmanyl lipids, in physiology and pathophysiology.

Heinz Zoller, Medical University of Innsbruck, AT

Heinz Zoller

As clinician scientist, Heinz Zoller hhas a long standing interest in the study of liver disease and liver tumors, disorders of the digestive tract as well as iron-, mineral-metabolism in health and disease. Since 2019, he is directing a research group investigating iron- and phosphate biology at the Christian Doppler Laboratory at the Medical University of Innsbruck. This laboratory was newly founded in September 2019 and represents an extension of the research group, which Heinz Zoller been leading since 2005 at the University Hospital’s Hepatology Laboratory. Heinz Zoller has recently been appoitented as Professor of Hepatology at the Medical University of Innsbruck.

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